Deborah Anastas | Needham Real Estate, Wellesley Real Estate, Newton Real Estate


You found the perfect home. It has everything you want from location to bedrooms to that art studio in the back, AND the mortgage payment will be lower than or the same as your current rent. You got qualified for the loan and the agent has all the paperwork ready to go. So that’s it, right? Time to buy!

In all the excitement of finding that new home, it’s easy to ignore the warning signs of “overspending” and forget that there are more costs than just the mortgage payment. This can be a dangerous game because once those papers are signed, you are stuck with your purchase. 

Additional Monthly Costs
For the best home-buying experience, calculate ALL your monthly costs and try to budget that into your life before you make any final decisions. Determine what you are willing to give up in order to get that extra bedroom or live in that perfect neighborhood. Some additional monthly charges include:

  • PMI “Private Mortgage Insurance”: Pay attention to the mortgage you qualify for and make sure to calculate for PMI in your new monthly budget if it applies. PMI exists to protect your lender in case you default on your mortgage loan. It’s usually included when you have a lower credit score or a smaller down payment and can range from $75 to $300 per month or more.
  • Homeowners Insurance: You’ve been paying renters insurance for a while now probably, but homeowners’ insurance is a completely different ball game. Your insurance cost will be based on the estimated cost to fix or rebuild your home after a catastrophic event, NOT its market value. That means any special features with historic value, specialty windows, etc. will increase the price. Also check out if the home is in a weather damage area, somewhere prone to tornadoes, flooding, hail, etc. It also covers everything inside your home from furnishings to clothes and electronics. The more stuff you have, the greater the cost to insure it.
  • Property Tax: Unlike tenants, owners pay taxes to local governments for schools, roads, city governments, etc. These vary greatly from area to area, so be sure to find a good local property tax calculator to help estimate what those charges will be. If you’re buying a home in a new neighborhood or a gentrifying one, there may be additional taxes to cover the cost of roads, streetlights, parks, and other new area features.
  • Association Fees/Dues: Nearly all condos belong to Home Owners Associations (HOAs). Depending on the neighborhood you choose, your single-family home may belong to one as well. HOAs handle neighborhood maintenance including streetlights, pool upkeep, exterior maintenance, parks, and even security. HOA dues can range from $50ish per month up into the hundreds of dollars or even more.
  • Services: You know all those utilities and local services currently included in your rent? As an owner, you must pay for all of them separately. That means water, power, trash, sewage, recycling, internet, cable, and phone bills all get added on top of your monthly payments as well. Some cities such as Austin, Texas, also have local monthly fees separate from property taxes, usually to cover extra city features like parks.

Other Costs
The most difficult costs to calculate or plan for are maintenance costs. If your landlord currently covers bug treatments, light bulbs, paint, carpeting, landscaping and generally all other maintenance, you will need to try and estimate how much of that you’ll need to pay for in your new home. There is no one else to pitch in, so this can end up being a huge additional cost.

So, How Do I Buy a Home Safely?
First, find yourself a good agent. A well-qualified agent who is familiar with your area and property needs can help you figure most of these costs. All you must do is ask. If your agent is unable or unwilling to help you plan for these, find yourself a new agent.

Ask your agent today if they can help you put together a true cost budget for each of the homes you’re interested in, that way you can make the best-informed decision. 

In times of rising temperatures and growing concerns of climate change, many of us are looking for small ways we can make a difference in our everyday lives. What better place to start than your own home?

It can be overwhelming to plan drastic eco-friendly changes to your home. That’s why we’ve broken these tips down room-by-room so that you can make changes in just one area and then build from there. Starting small will help you see your environmentally-minded project through to the finish.

Read on for tips for each room of your home to make your life more eco-friendly.

Bedroom

We’ll start with a small and easy one: the bedroom. Odds are your bedroom isn’t hogging too much power or creating a lot of waste. However, there are a few small changes you can make that will help you save some money while helping out the environment.

If your bedroom tends to get chilly at night, try using insulating curtains to help keep the cool air from slipping in through the windows. Similarly, on hot days close the curtains at peak sunlight hours to keep the bedroom cool. This small change could save you from having to turn up the heat or air conditioner when you enter your room each night.

The next time you clean out your closet, bring your items to a local thrift store or charity drop-off. You can even ask for a receipt which will make your donation tax-deductible. This way your clothes can extend their lives and stay out of a landfill a bit longer, and you’ll be helping out someone who could use the clothing.

Kitchen

Kitchen appliances offer a lot of opportunity for energy and water waste. When shopping for appliances, seek out appliances that meet Energy Star standards.

When it comes to water, forego the plastic bottles and buy a glass or metal refillable water bottle. Tap filters can greatly improve the taste, and you might find after a few days that you don’t even notice the water tasting differently.

Consider composting kitchen scraps in a composting bin. You can later use this for fertilizing plants in your yard and garden. And, finally, be sure you’re recycling all of your empty food and beverage containers.

Living Room

Is your living room your entertainment center? If so, many of your devices, like cable boxes and streaming media devices, might continue running on “standby mode” wasting electricity. To prevent this, simply plug all of your devices into a power strip and turn it off at night.

Bathroom

Start by using refillable hand soap containers rather than buying a new one each time you run out. This will save you a lot of money in the long run and save you trips to the store as well.

If your hot water takes a long time to heat up and you find yourself running the tap often, consider installing a recirculating water pump in your bathroom.

House-wide improvements

To save on electricity throughout the house, make sure you’re using compact fluorescent bulbs and only keeping the lights on when you’re in the room.

When cleaning, try using non-toxic cleaners or making your own from solutions of water, vinegar, and citrus essentials. 


A home selling negotiation may seem like a major hassle, particularly for property sellers who want to find a buyer as soon as possible. Fortunately, a prepared home seller will be able to streamline the property selling cycle as well as get the best price for his or her residence.

What does it take to complete a successful home selling negotiation? Here are three must-haves that will ensure any home seller can finalize a successful negotiation quickly and effortlessly.

1. Housing Market Data

Understanding the ins and outs of the housing market can help an ordinary home seller become an exceptional one. As such, if you allocate the necessary time and resources to collect housing market data, you may be better equipped to enter a negotiation as an informed home seller.

Housing market data is readily available – you just need to know where to look for it.

For example, home sellers can examine the prices of recently sold houses that are similar to their own. By doing so, home sellers can see how their house stacks up against the competition – and whether the price a homebuyer wants for a residence is in line with similar properties.

2. Realistic Expectations

Let's face it – as much as a home seller would like to enjoy a fast, seamless negotiation with a property buyer, many hurdles may delay a home sale. But a home seller who establishes realistic expectations before a negotiation begins may be able to minimize stress.

For home sellers, it is important to understand that a negotiation must meet the needs of both a property buyer and seller. And if you consider the homebuyer's perspective, you may be able to enter a negotiation with an open mind.

Furthermore, a home seller should be unafraid to walk away from a negotiation if necessary. Although exiting a negotiation is far from ideal, it is important to remember that it is always an option. Thus, if a negotiation reaches a point where you start to feel uncomfortable, you can always walk away and relaunch your efforts to sell your house.

3. An Expert Real Estate Agent

No one should be forced to enter a home selling negotiation without expert assistance. Luckily, real estate agents are available in cities and towns nationwide, and these housing market professionals possess the skills and know-how to assist home sellers during negotiations.

An expert real estate agent will serve as a liaison between a home seller and homebuyer. He or she will provide honest, unbiased recommendations throughout each stage of a home selling negotiation, ensuring you can make informed decisions along the way. Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent is happy to respond to any home selling concerns and queries – without exception.

Want to take the guesswork out of negotiating a home sale? Consider the aforementioned factors before you begin a home selling negotiation, and you can improve your chances of securing the best price for your residence.


This Condo in Stoneham, MA recently sold for $327,500. This Mid-Rise style home was sold by Deborah Anastas - Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Commonwealth Real Estate.


131 Franklin St, Stoneham, MA 02180

Condo

$309,900
Price
$327,500
Sale Price

5
Rooms
2
Beds
2
Baths
SIMPLISTICALLY BEAUTIFUL best describes this meticulously maintained 2 Bedroom CORNER UNIT located in STONEHAM’S Brookmeadows! Its freshly painted and highlighted with beautiful espresso finished flooring throughout, designer lighting fixtures, a modern kitchen, two fully renovated bathrooms, and a private balcony. Featuring a large MASTER SUITE equipped with a walk-in closet and a full master bathroom showcasing designer tile flooring. With IN-UNIT LAUNDRY, a DEEDED PARKING spot & EXTRA STORAGE, this unit is a SMART BUY. Stoneham is a commuter dream, offering a close proximity to all major routes including 93, 95 & RT 1. Let’s not forget about the HIP DOWNTOWN FEATURING fabulous restaurants, a farmers’ markets, and a fantastic theater! DON’T MISS THIS opportunity!

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You may not think much about your hot water heater. Unless of course, your hot water heater ends up breaking down. Hot water is so important in our homes, yet we take this resource for granted. Hot water does a lot in our homes from clean our laundry to disinfect our dishes to heat up our showers. We use it without thinking about it.  


If you neglect your hot water heater it can cause some costly damage to your home. Your basement could end up flooded. Pipes can burst. You can be without the use of hot water for days- even weeks- if you’re not vigilant about taking care of your hot water heater. 


Once water is gushing from the source, the best course of action is to simply shut the water off to your home. Before you even get to that point there are some tell tale signs of damage to your hot water heater that can be detected before major issues arise. First, if you notice any type of water around your hot water heater, you should get it checked out. Don’t look at it as “no big deal.” Any type of moisture or water stains around the water heater itself are a sure sign that something isn’t right with the unit.


As a homeowner, you should know just how old your hot water heater is. Usually, the installation date on the heater is noted somewhere along with the serial number. The typical hot water heater lasts about 9-11 years. If you live in an area with hard water, this number can vary.   



The Cleanup


Once the damage is done to your hot water heater you’ll likely have a large cleanup project on your hands. You’ll need to call water extraction services that will help dry out the area and clean up any baseboards that can become hazardous. Sometimes, these projects can get a bit bigger than you’d ever expect. After the water is pumped out, the cleanup has only just begun.  


Why Hot Water Heaters Fail


The minerals from water tend to build up (especially in the case of hard water) and cause the unit to rust out form the inside. While the inside of the tank contains glass, it does have metal pieces that can rust. You can replace certain parts of the hot water heater from time to time to keep it in good working order, the best prevention is to replace your water heater when the time is right. Don’t let the unit sit until way past its expiration date.


Being The Homeowner


As a homeowner, you probably wonder if something like a broken water heater were to happen if your insurance would cover the cost of the damage. The insurance will cover the cost of cleanup and repairs. The insurance will not cover the cost to replace the hot water heater or any labor costs. The only way the entire cost would be covered is if you have a home warranty. 


A simple thing that you can get to help alleviate major damage to your home from a hot water heater is to get an alarm. This little device is inexpensive and will alert you when any water hits near the areas of the alarm. This could save you a lot of costly damage and repairs. The most important thing that you can do in your home to prevent major damage from a hot water heater is to stay vigilant and keep on top of maintenance and replacement timelines.           





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